Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME <p>The official journal of the Centre for Medical Education (CME), Mohakhali, Dhaka and the Association for Medical Education (AME), Bangladesh. Full text articles available.</p> Centre for Medical Education and Association for Medical Education en-US Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2306-0654 No part of the materials published in this journal may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission of the publisher. Reprints of any article in the Journal will be available from the publisher. Editorial Vol.14(1), January 2023 https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63676 <p>Abstract not available</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 1-2</p> Md Humayun Kabir Talukder Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 1 2 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63676 Do Phase 1 MBBS students embrace E-learning intensely? A comparative study between rural and city based medical colleges of West Bengal, India https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63677 <p><strong>Introduction: </strong>This study investigated medical students’ perception of E-learning and online assessment during Covid-19 and their suggestion to overcome the problems.</p> <p><strong>Method: </strong>A total of 300 1st year medical students of Calcutta National Medical College and Rampurhat Govt. Medical College were surveyed by a pre-validated semi-structured questionnaire that was provided to the 2021-22 batch.</p> <p><strong>Result: </strong>Among 242 respondents (169 at CNMC and 73 at RPHGMC)159 were males (mean age 20.14 ±2.22yrs.) and 83 were females (mean age 19.65±.1.1yrs.). 68.8% of students of both the colleges revealed that offline traditional teaching is more preferrable than e-leaning. They reported that e-learning is not much effective in practical physiology teaching. Poor network, Technical glitches and lack of communication with teachers are outlined as major barriers in online teaching.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Students did not prefer e-teaching over face-to-face teaching during the lock down situation.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 3-16</p> Sanhita Mukherjee Sagarika Sarkar Hrishikesh Bagchi Diptakanti Mukhopadhyay Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 3 16 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63677 Exploring the glass ceiling phenomenon among the recent female medical graduate of Bangladesh https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63678 <p>This was a descriptive type of cross sectional study conducted with an objective to find out the unacknowledged barrier to the advancement in medical profession of the recent female medical graduates of Bangladesh. The “glass ceiling” is a metaphor to convey the undefined obstacles that women and minorities face in the workplace. In this study, a self-administered, semi-structured questionnaire was used for data collection and also In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight about the cause of drop out and to identify the barrier in academic progression and employment opportunities; along with the possible solution to overcome those obstacles. In this study, it was revealed that among the (817)recent female medical graduates only 12% were satisfied with their overall employment status while, majority (33.4%) were dissatisfied with their overall employment status. Of which extended work hour happens to main cause (68.8%) of their dissatisfaction. Regarding the Adequacy on the opportunity to enroll for post-graduation majority (47.9%) consider it to be inadequate. And also majorities (36.7%) are dissatisfied with their overall academic progression. Study has revealed many ways by which employment status can be improvised and can be made more female friendly, by starting ‘Day-care’ services in every working institute. Also by improving work environment and living environment at peripheral areas, ensuring more safety and security. Academic engagement can be improved by making exam center more accessible and by providing wide range of training scope.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 17-25</p> Nadia Ireen Chowdhury Murshed H Yasmen N Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 17 25 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63678 Recent Medical Graduates’ Abilities in Carrying Out Consultations with Patients: Views of Interns, Medical teachers, and Medical Graduates https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63679 <p>This descriptive type cross sectional study was carried out to explore the views of medical teachers, medical graduates and intern doctors regarding ability of recent graduates on consultation with patients. Study period was from January 2021 to December 2021. The study was carried out in twelve government, private and army medical colleges across Bangladesh. Sample size total 636 medical teachers, medical graduates and intern doctors. Convenience sampling technique was adopted in selecting medical college and purposive sampling technique is adopted for respondent in this study. Data were collected by self administered semi structured questionnaire and data were then compiled and analyzed using SPSS version 26. Among 636 participants, majority were intern doctors (39.3%) followed by 33.8% medical graduates and teachers (26.8%). Majority of the respondents were from government medical college i.e., 51.8% followed by 30.1% from private medical college and 18.2 % from army medical college. Study revealed that all respondents (Medical teachers, medical graduates and intern doctors) agreed that for consultation with patients, recent medical graduates are more prepared in taking history and physical examination; but least prepared in breaking bad news. Majority of the all three participants’ teachers, medical graduated and intern doctors had provided a mild positive agreement about the recent medical graduates’ patient consultation skill. None of them had given strongly positive agreement about recent medical graduates’ ability on patient consultation skill. Further research needed to generalize this study finding.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 26-34</p> Hasan Murshed Alam KK Chowdhury NI Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 26 34 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63679 Current Practice of Logbook-based Internship Programme in Undergraduate Medical Education of Bangladesh: Intern Doctors’ Views https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63680 <p><strong>Background: </strong>The medical internship of Bangladesh is designed supervised training programme for newly graduate medical doctors to gain necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes, ethics necessary to identify, analyze and manage clinical problems in order to provide effective, efficient and competent patient care independently in future.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from 01 July 2021 to 30 June 2022 upon 400 intern doctors to get their views administering a self-administered structured questionnaire about current practice of the logbook-based internship programme in undergraduate medical education of Bangladesh.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The study found that mean sores of interns by their agreement about initiation of their internship, the process of their internship, achievement of competency during their internship and methods of the training during their internship were above 4 out of 5 point Liker scale.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The logbook-based internship programme in undergraduate medical education of Bangladesh were going very satisfactory.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 35-42</p> Amena Sharmeen Kazi Khairul Alam Nazma Sultana Md Abdal Mia Mohammad Abu Sayeed Talukder Thanadar Tamjeeda Tapu Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 35 42 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63680 Pharmacology Written Questions of One Decade: Evaluation of Curricular Objectives and Content Coverage https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63681 <p>Undergraduate pharmacology education has always been a topic of intense excitement and debate. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to analyze the pharmacology written question papers (SAQ) of MBBS curriculum in last 10 years (January 2010 to November 2019)<strong>. </strong>Total 131 question papers were collected, and reflection of curricular objectives and content coverage of pharmacotherapy of diseases of high burden were evaluated. Objective regarding factual knowledge (pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetic characteristics and adverse reactions of drugs) occupied about 80 percent of the questions throughout the last decade. Medicines used in diseases of high burden received very little weightage, which is consistent throughout the decade.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 43-49</p> Fatema Johora Asma Akter Abbasy Sabiha Mahboob Fatiha Tasmin Jeenia Jannatul Ferdoush Md Sayedur Rahman Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 43 49 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63681 Learning Skills Using Simulated Teaching Materials by Students and Interns: Teachers’, Students’ and Interns’ Views https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63682 <p>This is a cross sectional study was conducted to find out views of teachers, students and interns on learning some common skills using simulated teaching materials by students and interns at undergraduate education in Bangladesh. The study was conducted from 1st January 2021 to 31st December 2021. One self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect data from conveniently selected 100 medical teachers, 150 undergraduate students and 150 intern doctors by online Google format or in some cases face to face. It was found that out of five point Likert scales (ranging 1 to 5) the mean scores of the views of the respondents were more than 3.5 regarding the different common skills that should be learned by the students and interns using simulated materials before performing on real patient. It was also found that the teachers, students and interns statistically differ highly in their opinions regarding most of the issues. It can be concluded that some important skills can be learn by students and interns at the undergraduate medical course using simulated teaching materials before performing on real patient.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 50-55</p> Nelufa Yasmen Lopa Kazi Khairul Alam Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 50 55 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63682 Integration in Undergraduate Medical Course of Bangladesh: Students’ and Teachers’ views https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63683 <p>This cross sectional study was conducted to evaluate the MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) course of Bangladesh on the basis of modern ‘Integrated teaching’ instead of corresponding traditional ‘Discipline-based teaching’. The study was conducted during the period of January 2021 to December 2021. Data were collected from conveniently selected eight medical colleges of Bangladesh. One self-administered semi-structured questionnaire was administered to collect data from 87 teachers and from 413 students of MBBS course. It was found that out of 4 point scale (1 to 4) the mean scores of respondents’ views regarding ‘Integrated teaching’ in the present curriculum was 1.2; on the other hand, their views regarding the future MBBBS course should adopt ‘Integrated teaching’ instead of traditional ‘Discipline based teaching’ was 3.47. The score of the respondents’ opinion regarding the different requirements were above 3.4 out of 4. Now it is best time to shift our MBBS course towards ‘Integrated teaching’ in instead of ‘Discipline-based teaching’.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 56-62</p> Mohammad Rashadull Islam Kazi Khairul Alam Mohammad Mohibur Rahman Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 56 62 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63683 Views of Final Phase Undergraduate Medical Students’ About the Personal & Familial Factors those Influence Their Future Career https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63684 <p><strong>Background</strong>: The understanding of the medical career decision-making process is important to aid career counseling and thus prevent wrong choices, support medical graduates in their choice and promote faster choices. An understanding of the factors which influence doctors’ career choices, and how attitudes vary among doctors who choose different specialties, is important for all those involved in the teaching and training of doctors.</p> <p><strong>Objectives</strong>: This study was done to explore views of final phase undergraduate medical students of Bangladesh about the personal &amp; familial factors those influence their future career selection.</p> <p><strong>Methods</strong>: This descriptive type of cross sectional study was conducted on 784 students randomly selected from eight medical colleges of Bangladesh, in the period of January 2019 to December 2019 with a pre tested self-administered questionnaire.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong>: Study revealed that a total of 784 students responded, out of which 318(40.6%) males and 466(59.4%) females. Among them 726(92.6%) students wanted to do post-graduation after graduation. The leading reasons for selecting future career were personal preference 348(50.6%), self confidence 272(39.1%) and to take care of other family members 223(32.9%).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong>: Study recommended that orientation and career counseling at different stages in undergraduate medical education may help students and future doctors to choose their specialty for career as per the community healthcare needs.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 63-69</p> Habibullah HM Talukder MAS Naiem Z Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 63 69 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63684 The art of writing a “Title” for an original research paper https://banglajol.info/index.php/BJME/article/view/63685 <p>This article is a short description on the ‘art of writing a title’ for an original research paper. Readers will get the ‘first impression’ with the title and decide to go further in. In searching journal article and thesis or dissertation, all users use the title as the main source of information. The “title” should not be misleading but be interesting, concise and unique. It is important to include the target terms (the “keywords”) in the title for appropriate indexing and retrieval from the search engines and scientific databases. One must adhere to the style and number of words in the title; suggested for the authors by the target journal or institutional authority. A strong title pulls the reader’s attention and encourage them to read the manuscript. Therefore, drafting a correct title needs careful and meticulous effort.</p> <p>Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education Vol.14(1) January 2023: 70-77</p> Md Abdul Wohab Khan Copyright (c) 2023 Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education 2023-01-07 2023-01-07 14 1 70 77 10.3329/bjme.v14i1.63685