Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CVC-BSI) in patients of clinically suspected septicemia

Authors

  • Zeenat Afroz Department of Microbiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka
  • Mohammad Jobayer Department of Microbiology and Immunology, BSMMU, Dhaka
  • Sharmeen Ahmed Department of Microbiology and Immunology, BSMMU, Dhaka
  • Shaheda Anwar Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dhaka
  • Md Ruhul Amin Mia Department of Microbiology and Immunology, BSMMU, Dhaka

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bmrcb.v41i2.29989

Abstract

Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CVC-BSI) are associated with morbidity and mortality especially in critically ill patients. This study was performed to find out the rate of CVC-BSI and CVC colonization, causative organism and their antibiogram in patients of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Department of Nephrology of tertiary care hospitals. A total of 100 patients from Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) who had CVC and clinically suspected of septicemia were included in the study. Paired CVC blood and peripheral venous blood (PVB) samples were collected from each patient and were cultured by automated blood culture method. CVC-BSI was diagnosed in 11% and CVC colonization in 43% patients by Differential time to positivity (DTP) method. Rate of CVC-BSI was 8/1000 CVC days and 11/1000 CVC days in BSMMU and DMCH respectively whereas CVC colonization rate was 32/1000 CVC days and 47.5/1000 CVC days in BSMMU and DMCH. The most common bacteria causing CVC-BSI was Klebsiella spp. (36.4%) followed by Acinetobacter spp. (27.3%), Pseudomonas spp. (18.2%) and E. coli (18.2%). Among bacteria isolated from CVC colonization majority were Pseudomonas spp. (30.23%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (30.23%) followed by Acinetobacter spp. (27.91%), Enterococcus spp. (6.98%). Most of the isolated bacteria causing CVC-BSI were resistant to commonly used antibiotics, but showed good sensitivity to imipenem and colistin. Information about CVC-BSI, colonization and antibiogram of this study can help to guide the selection of suitable antibiotics for empirical therapy and to improve infection control measures of the hospital.

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Published

2016-10-18

How to Cite

Afroz, Z., Jobayer, M., Ahmed, S., Anwar, S., & Mia, M. R. A. (2016). Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CVC-BSI) in patients of clinically suspected septicemia. Bangladesh Medical Research Council Bulletin, 41(2), 89–94. https://doi.org/10.3329/bmrcb.v41i2.29989

Issue

Section

Research Papers