Human health risk assessment due to Cadmium accumulation through consumption of Chinese cabbage grown in Cadmium-contaminated soil

Authors

  • MA Mahmud Department of Soil, Water and Environment, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000
  • M Hassan Department of Soil, Water and Environment, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000
  • R Hassan Department of Soil, Water and Environment, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000
  • R Mandal Department of Soil, Water and Environment, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000
  • MK Rahman Department of Soil, Water and Environment, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/jbcbm.v3i1.36755

Keywords:

Cadmium, Chinese cabbage, THQ model, Bio-concentration factors, Human health risk assessment

Abstract

Heavy metal like Cadmium (Cd) is a common pollutant present in the soils of urban and industrial areas. Vegetables are preferably grown in these soils than other crops. Of the vegetables, Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris var. pekinensis) is gaining its popularity among farmers for its high market value. Therefore, an experiment was conducted where cabbage was grown on Cd treated soil. Bioaccumulation of Cd in Chinese cabbage was determined and Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) model was used to assess potential health risk of human. Results showed that with increasing concentration of added Cd (0.00 to 4.00 ppm) in soil, bio-concentration factors of Cd of Chinese cabbage also increased except at 4 ppm. The chinese cabbage grown in Cd contaminated soils up-to 1.00 ppm might be safe. However, cabbage grown in the soils contaminated with Cd above this level would probably be risky and may cause serious health hazard to human body.

J. Biodivers. Conserv. Bioresour. Manag. 2017, 3(1): 1-8

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Published

2018-05-22

How to Cite

Mahmud, M., Hassan, M., Hassan, R., Mandal, R., & Rahman, M. (2018). Human health risk assessment due to Cadmium accumulation through consumption of Chinese cabbage grown in Cadmium-contaminated soil. Journal of Biodiversity Conservation and Bioresource Management, 3(1), 1–8. https://doi.org/10.3329/jbcbm.v3i1.36755

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Articles