Effects of Holy Basil (Ocimum Sanctum Linnaeus) On the Modulation Of Stress in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus Linnaeus)

Authors

  • A Biswas Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University Fort Wayne, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., Fort Wayne, IN 46805, USA
  • L Mason Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University Fort Wayne, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., Fort Wayne, IN 46805, USA
  • A Mustafa Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University Fort Wayne, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., Fort Wayne, IN 46805, USA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/jbcbm.v8i2.63813

Keywords:

Aquaculture; Nutraceuticals; Cortisol supplement; Stress response

Abstract

Fish in aquaculture face stress, which is a major concern due to its effects on the overall wellbeing of the fish. To modulate the stress responses, researchers are turning to the use nutraceuticals rather than chemical drugs. In a six-week long study, holy basil (Ocimum sanctum) was used to observe its effects on stress in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Stress was induced by adding cortisol with the feed as a supplement. Three different treatments (control, stress, stress- basil), each with two replicates, were used to measure serum cortisol, lysozyme activity, macrophage phagocytosis, spleen somatic index, and condition factor. Basil had no significant effect on any of the parameters when comparing the stress and stress basil treatments. But the result showed significant imperative effect of stress due to cortisol supplement in both stress and stress-basil groups. The results suggest that basil may have potentials to modulate the stress response in Nile tilapia.

J. Biodivers. Conserv. Bioresour. Manag. 2022, 8(2): 1-12

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Published

2023-01-16

How to Cite

Biswas, A., Mason, L., & Mustafa, A. (2023). Effects of Holy Basil (Ocimum Sanctum Linnaeus) On the Modulation Of Stress in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus Linnaeus). Journal of Biodiversity Conservation and Bioresource Management, 8(2), 1–12. https://doi.org/10.3329/jbcbm.v8i2.63813

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