A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY ON <i>FASCIOLA GIGANTICA</i> AND <i>GIGANTOCOTYLE EXPLANATUM</i> BURDENS IN NATURALLY INFECTED BUFFALOES IN BANGLADESH

Authors

  • MA Alim Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MK Islam Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MMH Mondal Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v3i1.11343

Keywords:

Fasciola gigantica, Gigantocotyle explanatum, burdens, buffaloes

Abstract

A cross sectional study on Fasciola gigantica and Gigantocotyle explanatum burdens in buffaloes in relation to their age, sex and health condition was carried out in the Laboratory of Parasitology, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh during the period from June to November 1997. A total of 460 faecal samples were examined to determine the egg per gram of faeces (epg) of F. gigantica. Higher epg was counted in female buffaloes (159.67 ± 6.80) than in males (153.24 ± 8.29). The epg counts were also found significantly (p < 0.01) higher in poor conditioned buffaloes (164.41 ± 6.67) than in buffaloes with normal health (128.57 ± 7.08). In relation to age, the young adult buffaloes were found to bear more parasitic burdens. The highest mean epg was recorded in the buffaloes of 2-3 years old (184.21 ± 19.14), followed by 3-5 years old (169.23 ± 30.77). The older buffaloes had relatively lower parasitic burden and the lowest mean epg was recorded in the growing buffaloes of up to 1 year old (125 ± 25.0). Examination of 106 livers from slaughtered buffaloes, revealed that the load of Fasciola gigantica and Gigantocotyle explanatum in the livers ranged from 13-424 (69.20 ± 6.46) and 41-427 (161.45 ± 10.79) respectively. In males the burden of F. gigantica (13-210) was lower than that of the females (15-424). The mean number of F. gigantica in the buffaloes of 5- 10 years old (100 ± 15.32) was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than those of the buffaloes of above 10 years old (52.92 ± 4.29). In case of single infection with F. gigantica, the mean number of parasites per liver was significantly (p < 0.05) higher (88.70 ± 11.48) than that of mixed infection cases (49.74 ± 4.20). Significantly (p < 0.01) higher number of G. explanatum was recovered from the buffaloes of 5-10 years old (207.53 ± 26.72) than from the buffaloes of above 10 years old (141.58 ± 9.23) and from single infected cases than from buffaloes with mixed infection. There were almost no differences in the number of both flukes in relation to sex of buffaloes. The length and breadth of immature and mature parasites were 5-15 min x 2-3 min and 16-72 mm x 4-14 mm respectively. No significant variation was found in the average size of F. gigantica in relation to the age and sex of buffaloes. But in case of single infection, the body size of mature F. gigantica (38.63 mm ± 0.38 mm x 9.96 mm ± 0.12 mm) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that of the mixed infection (33.68 mm ± 0.52 mm x 8.76 mm ± 0.07 mm) cases. This study fairly suggests that the young adult buffaloes harbour more F. gigantica parasites than their younger and older counterparts. The concomitant infection of buffaloes with F. gigantica and G. explanatum may hamper the parasites each other in establishing their infection and attaining growth in some way as measured by their burdens and morphological dimensions.

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Published

2012-07-21

Issue

Section

Food Animal Medicine