BACTERIAL PATHOGENS AND RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH MASTITIS IN BLACK BENGAL GOATS IN BANGLADESH

Authors

  • MA Amin Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh.
  • MA Samad Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh.
  • AKM Anisur Rahman Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v9i2.13458

Keywords:

Bacteria, Risk factors, Mastitis, Goat

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to isolate major bacteria responsible for and to identify the potential risk factors associated with clinical and subclinical mastitis in Black Bengal goats in Bangladesh. A cross sectional study was undertaken on 242 lactating does during January to August 2009. Data on probable risk factors was recorded by usingĀ  questionnaire. Clinical mastitis was detected by gross signs of udder infection during physical examination and abnormal milk whereas subclinical mastitis was recognized California Mastitis test (CMT) Milk samples of all clinical and subclinical mastitis goats were subjected to culture for isolation and identification of responsible bacterial pathogens. Multiple logistic regression model using a backward stepwise method was used for identification of risk factors. The overall prevalence of clinical mastitis and subclinical mastitis were 4.54% and 37.19%, respectively. Bacterial pathogens isolated were coagulase negative Staphylococcus (73.73%), Staphylococcus aureus (26.67%), Streptococcus sp. (20%), Bacillus sp. (70%) and Escherichia coli (6.67%). Both clinical and subclinical mastitis were significantly associated with age (p<0.001), parity (p<0.001), lactation stage (p<0.001), litter size (p<0.05) and teat lesions (p<0.001).

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v9i2.13458

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Abstract
1076
PDF
2200

Downloads

Published

2013-01-22

Issue

Section

Ruminant Medicine