Prevalence of feline influenza virus infection in cat in Mymensingh and Chapai Nawabgonj districts of Bangladesh

Authors

  • ME Alam Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MS Rahman Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • RR Sarker Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • A Nahar Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • SU Bhuiyan Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MAS Sarker Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • SK Dey Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MAHNA Khan Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v11i2.19143

Keywords:

Feline Influenza virus, Cat, RapiGen® Feline influenza Ag Test kit, Bangladesh

Abstract

The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Feline influenza virus (FInV) infection in cat in Chapai Nawabgonj and Mymensingh district of Bangladesh during October, 2011 to April, 2012. A total of 122 nasal swab samples were collected randomly from cats of selected areas and questionnaire based data on location, ownership status, age, season and health status of cat were recorded. The test was performed by commercial rapid RapiGen® Feline influenza Ag Test kit following the manufacturers (RapiGen Inc., korea) instructions. Overall prevalence of FInV infection was recorded 3.28% where 2.53% in Mymensingh (Mymensingh sadar) and 4.65% in Chapai Nawabgonj (Bholahat) district. The prevalence was 3.45% in unowned cat and 2.86% in owned cat. The prevalence was 3.75% in <1 years age group, 5.00% in >7 years age group and no positive case found in 1-7 years age group. The prevalence was 4.48% in winter season, 3.03% in summer season and no positive case was found in rainy season. The prevalence was 18.18% in sick cat and no positive case was found in apparently healthy cat. No statistically significant relationship was found in relation to location, ownership status, age, season and health status of cat. More study is needed to know the detail epidemiology of this disease in cat population in Bangladesh.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v11i2.19143

Bangl. J. Vet. Med. (2013).11(2): 167-172

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M. E. Alam and others

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Published

2014-06-13

Issue

Section

Small Animal Medicine