Screening of chloramphenicol residues in chickens and fish in Chittagong city of Bangladesh

Authors

  • MA Bakar Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories, Chittagong, Bangladesh
  • AJM Morshed Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories, Chittagong, Bangladesh
  • F Islam Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories, Chittagong, Bangladesh
  • R Karim Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, IFST, Dhaka, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v11i2.19144

Keywords:

Chicken, Fish, Chloramphenicol, LCMSMS

Abstract

Chloramphenicol, an illegal antibiotic has been widely used in aquaculture and poultry as an anti-microbial agent which has been banned in many countries for its toxic side effects. A random screening of chloramphenicol residues in some poultry and fishes by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have been carried out. The determined concentrations of chloramphenicol in farmed and wild chickens and its liver, various types of farmed fishes were in the range of minimum value of 0.133 µg/ kg to the highest value of 0.515 µg/ kg. The lowest concentration of 0.133 µg/ kg was determined in Pungas fish and the highest of 0.515 µg/ kg in Rui fish. Minimum Required Performance Limit (MRPL) in food of animal origin like Meat, Eggs, Milk, Urine, Honey and Aquaculture products for Chloramphenicol is 0.3 µg/ kg. The results of eight samples out of thirteen have been exceeded the limit of MRPL. So it is a matter of great concern for us.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v11i2.19144

Bangl. J. Vet. Med. (2013).11(2): 173-175

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References

Anonymous (2013). Amfep statement on chloramphenicol contamination in a feed enzyme preparation. [http://www.amfep.org].

EC (2003). Imports of animals and food of animal origin from non-EU countries, Commission decision.181 pp-12

Kenneth MB, David G.W, Michael EH, Toni LP and Dabid JN (2005). The chloramphenicol resistance gene cmlA is disseminated on transferable plasmids that confer multiple-drug resistance in swine Escherichia coli. FEMS Microbiology Letters 243: 285291.

Mehdizadeh S, Kazerani HR and Jamshidi A (2010). Screening of chloramphenicol residues in broiler chickens slaughtered in an industrial poultry abattoir in Mashhad, Iran. Iranian Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology 2(1): 25-32.

Raffi SM and Suresh TV (2011). Screening of Chloramphenicol in wild and cultured shrimp Penaeus monodon by Competitive Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay, International Conference on Chemical, Biological and Environment Sciences (ICCEBS'2011) Bangkok.

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Published

2014-06-13

Issue

Section

Veterinary Public Health