Seasonal Influence on The Occurrence of <i>Haemonchus contortus</i> Infection in Slaughtered Black Bengal Goats in Bangladesh

Authors

  • M Shahiduzzaman Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202
  • MA Alim Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202
  • M Rahman Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202
  • MMH Mondal Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v1i1.1917

Keywords:

Seasonal influence, Haemonchus contortus, Black Bengal goat, Bangladesh

Abstract

Seasonal influence on the occurrence of Haemonchus contortus parasite was studied on 672 slaughtered Black Bengal goats during one year period from July 2002 to June 2003. An overall 65.63% goats had H. contortus infection and significantly (p < 0.01) higher infection rate was recorded in female (70.43%) than male (58.61%) goats. A positive correlation between the occurrence of H. contortus infection and climatic factors was recorded. Significantly (p < 0.01) highest infection rate of H. contortus was recorded during rainy (72.57 %) season in comparison to summer (66.46%) and winter (51.54%) seasons. The infection was recorded at the peak in July (84.42%) and lowest in January (46.15%). The load of H. contortus per abomasum varied significantly (p < 0.05) in different months of the year and an average maximum number of parasites per abomasum was recorded in July (41.25) and the minimum in March (5.52). In case of sex ratio of the parasites always the female (60.73%) were found to be dominated over the males (39.27%) parasites.    

Key words: Seasonal influence; Haemonchus contortus; Black Bengal goat; Bangladesh

DOI = 10.3329/bjvm.v1i1.1917

Bangl. J. Vet. Med. (2003). 1(1) : 45 - 48

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Abstract
772
PDF
536

Downloads

Issue

Section

Food Animal Medicine