Prevalence of Gastrointestinal Helminth Infections in Indigenous Chickens of Selected Areas of Barisal District, Bangladesh

Authors

  • MN Alam Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • M Mostofa Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MAHNA Khan Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MA Alim Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • AKMA Rahman Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • AA Trisha Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v12i2.21275

Keywords:

Prevalence, gastrointestinal helminthes, pathology, indigenous chickens

Abstract

The prevalence of gastrointestinal helminth infections and the gross pathological lesions produced by them were studied from February 2012 to January 2013 in the Department of Pharmacology of Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh. In this study, a total of 320 indigenous chickens aged ranging from 2 to 4 months were examined to identify the different types of gastrointestinal helminth infections in indigenous chickens. During routine examination, six species of helminth parasites were recorded, of which five species of nematodes such as Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum, Capillaria spp, Acuaria hamulosa and Dispharynx spiralis; and one species was cestode called Raillietina tetragona. The highest prevalence was observed for Ascaridia galli (41.56%) followed in descending order by Raillietina tetragona (19.68%), Heterakis gallinarum (15.62%), Acuaria hamulosa (8.75%), Capillaria spp. (4.68% ) and Disopharinx spiralis (1.56%). The gross pathological lesions were observed in case of Acuaria hamulosa and Heterakis gallinarum infection. In case of Acuaria hamulosa infection keratinization of gizzard mucosa and cross section of adult Acuaria hamulosa were seen along with marked infiltration of neutrophils. The results of this study suggest that both nematodes and cestodes are highly prevalent in indigenous chickens in the studied area.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v12i2.21275

Bangl. J. Vet. Med. (2014). 12 (2): 135-139

 

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Published

2014-12-22

Issue

Section

Avian Medicine