Prevalence of <i>Cryptosporidium</i> Infection in Cattle in Maiduguri, North Eastern Nigeria

Authors

  • SG Adamu Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University of Maiduguri, Nigeria
  • NB Adamu Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University of Maiduguri, Nigeria
  • AU Aliyu Ministry of Animal and Fisheries Development Damaturu, Yobe State, Nigeria
  • NN Atsanda Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University of Maiduguri, Nigeria
  • FB Mustapha Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University of Maiduguri, Nigeria
  • YA Muhammad Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University of Maiduguri, Nigeria
  • GA Umaru Department of Animal Health, College of Agriculture, Jalingo, Taraba State, Nigeria

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v13i1.23712

Keywords:

Cryptosporidium sp., cattle, maiduguri, oocyst, prevalence, Nigeria

Abstract

A study was carried out to survey the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in Maiduguri, Northeastern Nigeria. A total of four hundred (400) fecal samples from cattle were randomly collected and examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen (MZN) staining method. The results showed that the overall prevalence of infection was 22.3%, with an infection rate of23.4% in adult cattle and 19.1% in young cattle, respectively. There was no statistical significant difference (P<0.05) between the age groups, with (OR: 1.298; 95%CI: 0.75072.245). Out of 89 positive samples, 21.2% were male and 25.0% were female, respectively. There was no statistical significant difference (P>0.05) between the sex, with (OR: 0.8062; 95% CI: 0.48280.346). It was concluded that Cryptosporidium sp. infection is prevalent in Nigeria; and cattle could serve as reservoirs for the zoonotic infection in humans.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v13i1.23712

Bangl. J. Vet. Med. (2015). 13 (1): 25-28


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Published

2015-06-17

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Section

Ruminant Medicine