EPIDEMIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION ON DUCK SALMONELLOSIS IN SOME SELECTED AREAS OF BANGLADESH

Authors

  • R. K. Dey
  • M. S. R. Khan
  • K. H. M. N. H. Nazir
  • M. A. Islam
  • S. M. S. H. Belal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v14i2.31385

Abstract

The study was performed with a view to collect epidemiological data to proper control of Duck Salmonellosis in Bangladesh. A total of 12 small to medium sized duck farms and 28 individual households were visited for data collection.  On the basis of history and clinical signs and as per the information provided by the farmers the prevalence rate of Duck Salmonellosis was recorded as 38.1% and the P value was calculated as 0.003 (p<0.01) which was noted as highly significant. Based on tentative occurrences of Duck Salmonellosis as per information taken from the structured questionnaire a total of 120 fecal samples were collected from apparently healthy and diseased ducks on the basis of age, sex, season, location and health status. The isolated bacteria were identified by studying cultural properties on different selective media, biochemical tests, and finally by PCR. The test results of cultural and biochemical exhibited the typical characteristics of bacteria. On the basis of their cultural and biochemical characteristics it was found that among 120 fecal samples 32 (26.67%) were found to be positive for Salmonella and the P value was recorded as 0.0019 (p<0.01) which was also considered as highly significant. In motility test Duck Salmonella were identified as motile and all tested Duck Salmonella showed indole and VP test negative with MR test positive. In PCR reaction, the organism was further confirmed as Salmonella species using the SAL-G primer. Results of antibiotic susceptibility test shows that the selected isolated Salmonella were highly sensitive to ciprofloxacin and azithromycin, intermediate sensitive to tobramycin and gentamicin and resistant to Oxacillin.

 

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Published

2017-02-03

Issue

Section

Avian Medicine