AQUACULTURE HEALTH MANAGEMENT AND BIOSECURITY PRACTISES IN SOUTH WEST OF BANGLADESH

Authors

  • B. Bhowmick
  • M. Crumlish

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v14i2.31407

Abstract

Bangladesh is now the world fourth largest inland fish producer and more than half of it comes from aquaculture according to 2012 ranking. The shrimp and prawn industry has gained an important place in the national economy and is the third highest foreign income earner. Concomitant with the growth of the shrimp and prawn culture industry has been the recognition of the ever increasing importance of disease, especially those caused by infectious agents. Few studies have aimed to identify the perception of risk and risk management strategies for small scale aquaculture facilities. The aim of this study was to understand existing health management practices in regards to water management practices and salinity in southwest coastal region of Bangladesh. Questionnaires were specifically designed to gather information on shrimp and prawn culture systems and multiple variables relating to disease outbreaks. A total of eight variables related to health management practices throughout production cycle were investigated comprising location of farm from primary source of water, pond preparation technique, water  management practices, in-pond nursing of post larvae (PL), source of PL, salinity level, stocking density and bio security practices. The results found that sharing of water source with other farms, non tested PL, high salinity level, shallow pond, lack of in-pond nursing were considered as diseases risk factors for poly-culture farming system. Furthermore, rainy season (June-August) is risk factors for diseases outbreak because sudden change of salinity level and drop temperature due to rain and freshwater upstream flow. However, risk factors are not direct causes of mortality; instead, risk factors contribute to mortality.

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Published

2017-02-03

Issue

Section

Aquatic Medicine