CLINICAL EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT TREATMENT REGIMES FOR MANAGEMENT OF MYIASIS IN CATTLE

Authors

  • MA Rahman Department of Surgery and Obstetrics, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MA Hossain Department of Surgery and Obstetrics, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MR Alam Department of Surgery and Obstetrics, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v7i2.6003

Keywords:

Myiasis, cattle, treatment, healing

Abstract

Therapeutic effects of three different treatment regimes on the healing of myiasis wound in cattle were evaluated in the present study. The study was conducted in 15 myiasis affected cattle brought to the Veterinary Clinic, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh. Dressing with oil of turpentine on alternate days and intramuscular administration of combined penicillin (procaine penicillin 300000 units and benzyl penicillin sodium 100000 units/50 kg body weight) and streptomycin (0.5 g/50 kg body weight) daily for 7 days resulted healing of 96% wound depth and 94% wound area. Another treatment regime consisted of subcutaneous administration of ivermectin (0.2 mg/kg body weight) and combined penicillin and streptomycin daily for 7 days which produced recovery of 94% wound depth and 90% wound area. In case of wound dressing with tincture of iodine on alternate days and parenteral administration of combined penicillin and streptomycin resulted in healing of 78% wound depth and 36% wound area. Myiasis wounds were very prone to occur in the navel, vulva, scrotum and shoulder area. These wounds predominantly occur in the cattle of over 2 years. The females were more frequently affected than the males. The present study suggests that, local dressing of wound with oil of turpentine and intramuscular administration of combined penicillin and streptomycin may be practiced for the clinical management of myiasis in cattle.

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Section

Ruminant Medicine