EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ECTOPARASITIC INFESTATIONS IN CATTLE AT BHAWAL FOREST AREA, GAZIPUR

Authors

  • SA Rony Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MMH Mondal Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • N Begum Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • MA Islam Department of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh
  • S Affroze Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjvm.v8i1.7399

Keywords:

Epidemiology, ecto-parasite, cattle, Bhawal forest, prevalence

Abstract

To determine the prevalence of ectoparasitic infestation of cattle in and around the Bhawal forest area in Gazipur district in Bangladesh, an epidemiological investigation was carried out during the period from November 2008 to October 2009. Of 206 cattle examined, 132 (64.07%) were found to be infested with several species of ticks and lice. The prevalence rate was highest in case of Boophilus microplus (45.63%) followed by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (36.89%), Linognathus vituli ((23.30%), Haematopinus euysternus (17.96%), Hemaphysalis bispinosa (16.50%), and Damalinia bovis (8.25%). Results revealed that, older cattle aged > 8 years are more (71.11%) susceptible than that of adults aged > 2-8 years (67.74%), and young aged ≤2 years (47.05%). In females, prevalence of ectoparasitic infestation was observed significantly (p< 0.005) higher than that of male. Prevalence of ectoparasitic infestation was significantly (p<0.005) higher in animal reared under free range system than that of semi-intensive system and cattle with malnourished and poor health status were found to be significantly more vulnerable to such parasitic infestation than normal healthy cattle. Seasonal prevalence showed that, significantly (p<0.001) higher prevalence occurred in summer season (78.46%), followed by winter (62.85%) and rainy season (52.11%). Mean parasitic burden were 1.49±0.80 per square inches of heavily infected area.

 

DOI = 10.3329/bjvm.v8i1.7399

Bangl. J. Vet. Med. (2010). 8(1): 27-33

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Ruminant Medicine