Beliefs related to the dying process and its impact on end-of-life care in the Marma community of Bangladesh: A qualitative study

Authors

  • Wai Wai Mroy Department of Palliative Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6790-0562
  • AKM Motiur Rahman Bhuiyan Department of Palliative Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Muhammad Ibrahim Ibne Towhid Department of Public Health and Informatics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7403-9627
  • Mostofa Kamal Chowdhury Department of Palliative Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2674-9752
  • Nezamuddin Ahmed Department of Palliative Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Md Atiqul Haque Department of Public Health and Informatics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v16i3.67162

Keywords:

beliefs, death and dying, end-of-life care, Marma community, Bandarban, Bangladesh

Abstract

Background: Marma indigenous community in Bangladesh has a unique culture with its religion, culture, language, and tradition. To provide appropriate healthcare and end-of-life support, healthcare providers must know their beliefs and customs near and after death. We explored the beliefs related to the dying process and its impact on end-of-life care in the Marma community of Bangladesh.

Methods: This cross-sectional qualitative study used an open-ended interview schedule for in-depth interviews. Twenty-six interviewees were selected purposively from the Marma community of Bandarban district to represent a population of different ages with varied experiences and religious knowledge. After each in-depth interview, all field notes and audio records were transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was done to construct the themes.

Results: After analysis, the generated theme indicated a ‘reflection of previous Karma (the sum of a person's actions)’ within the Marma community. This theme is based on three categories: 'state of the body and mind’, ‘care of a dying person’, and ‘beliefs on the dying process’.

Conclusion: Death is inevitable for all of us, but suffering in death is not desired. Like other communities around the world, the Marma community also holds its own beliefs and practices regarding end-of-life care related to death. The death of a person in his own house is considered a good death within the Marma community. In the traditional death ritual practices of the Marma community, palliative care in the form of end-of-life care has the potential to enhance the quality of life, alleviate suffering, and enable a peaceful passing with dignity.

angabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Journal 2023;16(3): 144-151

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Published

2023-09-27

How to Cite

Mroy, W. W. ., Bhuiyan, A. M. R. ., Ibne Towhid, M. I. ., Chowdhury, M. K. ., Ahmed, N., & Haque, M. A. (2023). Beliefs related to the dying process and its impact on end-of-life care in the Marma community of Bangladesh: A qualitative study. Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Journal, 16(3), 144–151. https://doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v16i3.67162

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Original Article

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