Demineralization level of human tooth enamel after exposure to alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages: A scanning electron microscopic study

Authors

  • Rozina Akter Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0154-1215
  • Mohammad Ali Asgor Moral Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • AKM Bashar Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Md Khalequzzaman Department of Public Health and Informatics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4638-7469
  • Mir Md. Mofazzal Hossain Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Dhaka Dental College, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Md Helal Uddin Department of Orthodontics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v17i1.70826

Keywords:

demineralization, human enamel, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverage, scanning electron microscope

Abstract

Background: In any beverage, human tooth enamel dissociates into its ionic products at a threshold pH of beverage <5.5. This study was done to illustrate and compare the demineralization level of enamel after exposure to alcoholic (beer, wine, distilled spirit) and non-alcoholic (carbonated beverage, apple cider vinegar, commercial fruit juice) beverages.

Methods: Prior to starting this quasi-experimental study of beverage exposure, buccal surface of enamel was scanned under scanning electron microscope to examine the existing score of enamel samples. Twenty-four non-demineralized samples were randomly flushed with attributed beverage and saliva simultaneously for three minutes by a digital automatic flusher. Samples were further scanned under scanning electron microscope after 30 exposures.

Results: pH levels of all beverages were <5.5. After exposure to beverages, all samples were demineralized and 66.6% of samples had the demineralization score of 3. Demineralization score of 2 was observed in 33.3% of samples. The demineralization mean score in non-alcoholic beverages was 3.0 compared to alcoholic beverages 2.3 (P=0.02).

Conclusion: All tested beverages had potential to demineralize the enamel structure. The enamel demineralization capacity of non-alcoholic beverages was higher compared to alcoholic beverages. The demineralization capacity of beverages is inversely proportional to their pH.

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References

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Published

2024-03-30

How to Cite

Akter, R., Moral, M. A. A. ., Bashar, A. ., Khalequzzaman, M. ., Hossain, M. M. M. ., & Uddin, M. H. . (2024). Demineralization level of human tooth enamel after exposure to alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages: A scanning electron microscopic study. Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Journal, 17(1), e70826. https://doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v17i1.70826

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